Collapse Sidebar

“Serious social unrest is coming in the next 5-10 years in this country as the police state gets dialed down.”

Jesse Zilge kicks Eric Hightower in face, Zilge & Matthew Gorans smash his head on hood of cop car

Discussion in 'Police / St. Paul' started by M, Sep 23, 2012.

  1. M

    M Muckraker

    Perps: St. Paul police officers Jesse Zilge and Matthew Gorans

    Victim: Eric Hightower

    Department: St. Paul Police Department

    What happens when you send two white thumpers out to arrest a black man? The results should not be a surprise to anyone.
    • Jesse Zilge was displined for "pushing an 18-year-old man and throwing him to the ground while working as a St. Paul Park officer in 2006". (Star Tribune)
    • St. Paul paid a $250,000 settlement and suspended Matthew Gorans for three days for a 2009 incident in which "he kicked and kneed a man several times in the head and neck area". (Minnesota Public Radio, Star Tribune)
    History repeats itself.

    This YouTube video of the latest incident was recorded by the victim's friend, Lord Stitts:


    CBS Local Minnesota: St. Paul Police Address YouTube Arrest Video (Aug 29 2012)

    St. Paul Police say they will address the content of a YouTube video showing an alleged incident of police brutality. The video was recently posted to YouTube, and shows a man being arrested by an officer [Jesse Zilge]. At one point in the video, it appears that the officer kicks the man in the throat while he’s lying down on the sidewalk. Later in the video, another officer [Matthew Gorans] arrives and the two are seen pulling the man’s hair and shoving the man face down onto the hood of the police cruiser.
    KARE 11: Man who shot arrest video tells his story (Aug 29 2012)

    The video that launched a St. Paul police investigation was shot by an auto mechanics student named Lord Stitts. Stitts says he was walking with his best friend Eric Hightower Tuesday evening when a police car drove across the grass through Lewis Park. "That's when he pulled up, jumped out with his Mace in his hand and just walked up Macing."

    Stitts says he grabbed his phone and started recording, as Hightower fell to the ground. "You see he's clearly choking on the mace, not resisting arrest or anything - kicked him in the face for no reason. Nobody can understand why he would do that." Stitts points to a spot in the video where the arresting officer appears to punch the handcuffed Hightower in the face, before two officers forcibly push Hightower's head into the hood of a squad car. "You catch that," says Stitts. "Slams him on the car."

    Stitts says he's most puzzled by the officer's apparent demeanor after the kick. "Watch his face; he's laughing, smiling," he says, referring to the video. "I mean, it's crazy."
    Pioneer Press: St. Paul: Arrested man says cop kicked him as he choked on Mace (w/ video) (Aug 29 2012)

    Eric Hightower was lying on the ground, coughing and choking because a St. Paul police officer had just squirted him with a chemical spray, when he said the officer suddenly kicked him. "It was like he was kicking a football or something," the 30-year-old man said Wednesday, Aug. 29, the day after his arrest, after a video of the officer's use of force was posted on YouTube. "He kicked me so hard, he knocked the wind completely out of me."

    St. Paul Police Chief Thomas Smith said Wednesday that he called for an expedited internal affairs investigation as soon as he saw the video, which he said "raised some serious concerns about the use of force of one of my officers."

    The video shows an officer, whom Smith identified as Jesse Zilge, kicking Hightower. After Hightower was handcuffed, Zilge and another officer slammed Hightower's face into a squad car hood, according to the video, which also shows officers apparently pulling the man's hair.
  2. M

    M Muckraker

    Star Tribune: Video shows St. Paul cop kicking man (Aug 30 2012)

    A St. Paul police officer is under investigation after city leaders expressed concerns about a video that shows him kicking a suspect in the chest and slamming his head into a squad car. Police Chief Thomas Smith said he called for an expedited investigation when the video, made during an arrest on Tuesday evening, came to his attention Wednesday morning. Officer Jesse Zilge, who is the only officer seen in the first half of the video, was put on paid administrative leave.
    KARE 11: St. Paul officer seen on video kicking man (Aug 30 2012)

    An investigation is underway following an arrest in St. Paul caught on tape and posted on YouTube (warning: video contains foul language). The video, which was recorded by a citizen Tuesday night, shows an officer kicking a man while he was lying on the ground during an arrest. Police spokesman Howie Padilla says Chief Thomas Smith immediately ordered an internal investigation after he saw the video, which was posted to YouTube on Wednesday.

    City Pages: St. Paul police brutality: Officer Jesse Zilge maces, kicks, punches helpless suspect [VIDEO] (Aug 30 2012)

    Around 6 p.m. on Tuesday evening, Eric Hightower was walking with friends to Lewis Park in St. Paul's North End. Near the intersection of Woodbridge and Milford streets, he was approached by an officer in a squad car. The officer, exiting his squad, demanded that Hightower and his buddies hit the ground. "We all stopped and were like, 'What's going on? Why?'" Hightower told the Pioneer Press. Next thing he knew, he had been sprayed in the face with a chemical irritant, apparently for no reason. Then, while Hightower was lying on the sidewalk, the officer -- later identified as Jesse Zilge -- kicked him under the chin and continued to douse his face with mace. The incident was caught on cell phone camera by one of Hightower's friends.
  3. M

    M Muckraker

    NY Daily News: VIDEO: Cop caught kicking suspect in face (Aug 30 2012)

    Police in Minnesota are investigating a case of police brutality after an officer in St. Paul was filmed kicking a man in the face during an arrest. The video, shot Tuesday and posted to YouTube on Wednesday, shows officer Jesse Zilge arresting Eric Hightower, 30, for allegedly threatening to kill a woman he knew, St. Paul police said. Hightower is lying on the ground and shouting at Zilge that he didn't do anything and doesn't know why he's being arrested, the video shows.

    My Fox Twin Cities: Victim of alleged St. Paul police brutality charged with threatening ex-girlfriend (Aug 30 2012)

    Charges of stalking, terroristic threats and property damage were filed Thursday against the victim of alleged police brutality in St. Paul that was captured on video and posted to YouTube. Eric Ronnell Hightower, 30, is accused of calling, harassing and threatening his 20-year-old ex-girlfriend over the past few days. The woman told police Hightower was the father of a baby she gave birth to this summer, which died within hours of the birth. She said he has been hostile and violent with her ever since the baby's death, to the point she moved to a different address to sever their relationship.

    On Friday, Aug. 24, Hightower's ex-girlfriend's called 911 around 9:51 p.m., as Hightower had found her new address and was breaking out the windows of the home. That incident was followed by more harassing calls and a message telling her she was about to get her "head blown off." On Tuesday, Aug. 28, the woman called 911 again to tell police they could find him hanging out at Lewis Park near Woodbridge Street and Milford Street. Hightower was arrested near the park that evening, but the charges against him make no mention of the incident captured on video.

    My Fox Twin Cities: SPPF: Video does not provide 'complete context' (Aug 30 2012)

    The St. Paul Police Federation released a statement on Thursday that says the video footage which sparked an internal review of an officer "does not provide complete context," saying it doesn't show why the officer felt threatened and kicked a man on the ground.
  4. M

    M Muckraker

    KSTP: Man Kicked by St. Paul Officer in Video Charged with Stalking (Aug 30 2012)

    A man whose apparently violent arrest by a Minnesota police officer was caught on video has been charged with stalking and making terroristic threats. Thirty-year-old Eric Hightower was charged Thursday in St. Paul. The complaint says Hightower threatened to kill his ex-girlfriend and had assaulted her before. The jail would not accept a message for Hightower. The complaint says he admitted calling the woman and threatening that she'd get her "head blown off," but that he only meant to scare her.

    WCCO: Charges Filed Against Man Shown In YouTube Arrest Video (Aug 30 2012)

    Officers responded to a call from [Eric] Hightower’s ex-girlfriend on Tuesday afternoon. She claimed he was threatening and harassing her. Police say he had harassing her for days before she called police. She told officers he had threatened to kill her. In one of the messages the woman played for officers, Hightower was heard exclaiming, “You’re about to get your mother ****ing head blew the **** off!”
  5. M

    M Muckraker

    Pioneer Press: St. Paul: Man kicked by cop in video charged with stalking ex; she says his violence has worsened (Aug 30 2012)

    Eric Hightower's ex-girlfriend says he'd been violent toward her in the past, and it escalated when their child died after being born prematurely about a month ago ... "I didn't want any harm to come to him," Kara Drew, Hightower's former girlfriend, said of his arrest. "If I was to wish harm to him, like he would to me, I would be just like him."

    City Pages: Eric Hightower, St. Paul police brutality victim, allegedly threatened to blow ex's head off (Aug 30 2012)

    Eric Hightower has been charged with aggravated stalking, making terroristic threats, and fourth-degree criminal damage to property. He's allegedly made his 20-year-old ex-girlfriend's life a living (expletive deleted) since their child died a few hours after being born earlier this summer. The woman played police a voicemail where Hightower can be heard saying, "You're about to get your motherfucking head blew the (expletive deleted) off!" She says she left him in May after he beat her up, adding that things have only gotten worse since their child's death. In fact, she says she's recently moved to a different address in hopes of getting Hightower out of her life.

    But Hightower apparently found out where she's living, and showed up there last Friday just before 10 p.m. He broke some windows at her home, prompting her to call 911. On Tuesday, she called police to inform them they could find Hightower hanging out at Lewis Park. Officers went there to arrest him, which is when the apparent police brutality incident went down.
  6. M

    M Muckraker

    My Fox Twin Cities: 2nd St. Paul police officer on leave in alleged police brutality (Aug 31 2012)

    As the investigation proceeded, officials became aware of new information that Smith believed warranted placing a second officer on administrative leave pending the outcome of the investigation. The details of the new information will not be made available at this time, as the internal investigation is ongoing.

    KARE 11: Details of what led to alleged police brutality come forward (Aug 31 2012)

    "He stalks me. He threatens me, and he leaves me voicemails," Hightower's ex-girlfriend Kara Drew said Thursday. Drew says she was in a relationship with Hightower for a year and a half when it ended last month. She says he started threatening her shortly thereafter. Police say they recovered seven voicemails on Drew's phone, all from Hightower saying as much. On Tuesday, Drew says Hightower made his final threat ...

    KSTP: 2nd St. Paul Officer on Leave in Alleged Case of Police Brutality (Aug 31 2012)

    A second St. Paul police officer was put on paid administrative leave as authorities continued to investigate the arrest of a man who was kicked by another officer in an incident captured on video, police said Friday ... Records obtained by The Associated Press show that the second officer on leave is Matthew Gorans. Records also show he was put on leave Thursday, joined the department as a trainee in 2009 and was suspended for three days in 2010 after being accused of excessive force.
  7. M

    M Muckraker

    Minnesota Public Radio: 2nd St. Paul cop on leave in video incident (Aug 31 2012)

    A second St. Paul police officer has been placed on administrative leave in connection with a police investigation of a video that appears to show one officer kicking a man and two officers slamming his head against a police car ... Police did not release the name of the second police officer or provide any details about his role in the incident.

    Minnesota Public Radio: 2nd officer on leave after videotaped arrest (Aug 31 2012)

    WCCO: 2nd Officer On Leave Over YouTube Arrest Flap (Aug 31 2012)

    Later in the video, another officer arrives and the two are seen pulling the man’s hair and shoving the man face down onto the hood of the police cruiser. The incident report from police listed Jesse Zilge as the primary reporting officer and Steven Petron as the secondary reporting officer. Officer Zilge was earlier this week placed on administrative leave while the department investigates the incident. A spokesperson for the department said Petron is currently still on duty. The second officer who was placed on leave has not been identified.

    CNN: Minn. officers on leave after video shows suspect being kicked (Aug 31 2012)

    The officer who kicked the suspect, identified by police as Jesse Zilge, had been put on leave earlier in the week. The name of the second officer was not released; police did not specify what role he played in the incident.
  8. M

    M Muckraker

    Star Tribune: St. Paul man in arrest video charged with threat (Sept 1 2012)

    A St. Paul man whose video-recorded arrest spurred an internal police investigation was charged on Thursday with aggravated stalking, terroristic threats and property damage after allegedly threatening his ex-girlfriend. The woman, with whom the suspect, Eric R. Hightower, 30, had a child who died soon after birth, told police that she had tried to distance herself from him but that he learned her new address and was peppering her with threatening phone calls, the charges say.

    Star Tribune: NAACP, church leaders denounce St. Paul police actions (Sept 1 2012)

    After years of building police-community relations, St. Paul community leaders said Saturday that dozens of residents now fear police after an officer was videotaped kicking a man under arrest. Denouncing the officer's actions, St. Paul NAACP President Jeffry Martin called on the community to "fight back" by reporting police brutality to show that Eric Hightower's case isn't isolated. "I know our community is disturbed by this. ... They are set back by what they see in that video," Martin said.

    My Fox Twin Cities: Community leaders speak out against alleged police beating (Sept 1 2012)

    African American community leaders are calling for justice after a man was kicked in the chest by a St. Paul Police officer while cameras were rolling. The alleged victim , Eric Hightower, also made his first public appearance on Saturday. He did not speak, but he joined community leaders who condemned the officer accused of beating him up. YouTube video captured by a witness shows Hightower being kicked in the chest by Officer Jesse Zilge. The video has led to an internal police investigation and growing community outrage. "It was judge, jury, and trial right out here on the street," said Pastor Darryl Spence, of the St. Paul God Squad.
  9. M

    M Muckraker

    Pioneer Press: St. Paul civic, religious leaders denounce violent arrest captured on video (Sept 1 2012)

    A coalition of black civic and religious leaders met Saturday, Sept. 1, in St. Paul's Lewis Park to decry a violent arrest captured on video in the North End park last week. "This situation is intolerable," said the Rev. Melvin Miller, a pastor at Progressive Baptist Church in St. Paul. "We're here to speak out against what is clearly an injustice. If it happened to any one of our brothers, sisters, friends, we'd be outraged about it, and rightfully so."

    KSTP: Community Leaders Decry Video of Cop Kicking Man (Sept 1 2012)

    A coalition of black community and religious leaders are denouncing the actions of a St. Paul police officer who was caught on video kicking a man lying on the ground ... The St. Paul Pioneer Press reports community leaders are concerned that trust between the public and police has been damaged beyond repair. Hightower's attorney, Seamus Mahoney, says they plan to sue. Mahoney has said Hightower experienced ear pain, headaches and swelling in his chest.

    WCCO: Leaders Call For Justice In Wake Of YouTube Arrest Video (Sept 1 2012)

    A man who was beaten by St. Paul Police joined his lawyer and leaders from the NAACP and African American Leadership Council at Lewis Park in St. Paul on Saturday, the same place where police arrested Hightower four days ago ... At Saturday’s meeting at Lewis Park, Eric Hightower remained quiet and reserved as his attorney, Seamus Mahoney, went through a list of injuries he suffered at the hands of a St. Paul Police officer. “Mr. Hightower is lucky he didn’t get his teeth kicked in, his heart bruised or his throat crushed,” said Mahoney. “To be beaten like a dog and to have to lie there and take it, it’s pretty traumatizing.”
  10. M

    M Muckraker

    Minnesota Public Radio: Community leaders decry video of cop kicking man (Sept 2 2012)

    A coalition of black community and religious leaders gathered Saturday to denounce the actions of a St. Paul police officer who was caught on video kicking a man lying on the ground ... "This situation is intolerable," the Rev. Melvin Miller, a pastor at Progressive Baptist Church in St. Paul, said Saturday. "We're here to speak out against what is clearly an injustice. If it happened to any one of our brothers, sisters, friends, we'd be outraged about it, and rightfully so."


    Fox 21: Community and Religious Leaders Denounce St. Paul Police Officer (Sept 21 2012)

    Black community and religious leaders are denouncing the actions of a St. Paul police officer who was caught on video kicking a man lying on the ground.
    The group gathered on Saturday to speak out against the way Eric Hightower was arrested ... “Regardless of what he was being charged with I don't think the actions were taken appropriately for somebody who was not resisting,” said Antonie Hightower, the suspect’s cousin.
  11. M

    M Muckraker

    My Fox Twin Cities: FBI joins investigation of St. Paul police brutality claims (Sept 5 2012)

    The FBI is now taking a look into the arrest of a man who was kicked by a St. Paul police officer while he was lying on the ground. The incident was recorded by a witness and uploaded to YouTube, which then sparked an internal investigation inside the St. Paul Police Department. FBI investigators are working to determine whether 30-year-old Eric Hightower's civil rights were violated during the arrest.

    KARE 11: FBI to probe possible civil rights violations in videotaped arrest (Sept 5 2012)

    The FBI says it's reviewing the arrest of a man who was kicked by a St. Paul police officer while the suspect was lying on a sidewalk. FBI spokesman Kyle Loven says the agency will look into possible civil rights violations of the man arrested, Eric Hightower of St. Paul. Video of the Aug. 28 arrest was recorded by a citizen and posted to YouTube. Loven tells the St. Paul Pioneer Press he did not know whether a formal complaint prompted the agency's investigation.

    KSTP: FBI Looks into Civil Rights Issues in Taped Arrest (Sept 5 2012)

    The FBI says it's reviewing the arrest of a man who was kicked by a St. Paul police officer while the suspect was lying on a sidewalk. FBI spokesman Kyle Loven says the agency will look into possible civil rights violations of the man who was arrested, Eric Hightower. Video of the Aug. 28 arrest was recorded by a citizen and posted to YouTube.​
  12. M

    M Muckraker

    Both of the officers had a history of prior disciplinary problems ...

    If you hire a bad cop, what you get is a bad cop. Surprise? This is what happens when you keep thumpers around.

    Pioneer Press: St. Paul: FBI takes closer look at YouTube arrest (w/ video) (Sept 5 2012)

    [Jesse] Zilge has been in trouble in the past for allegedly throwing a man to the ground, according to information released Tuesday by the city of St. Paul Park, where he was formerly an officer. In February 2006, Zilge questioned Troy Drusch, then 18, and confronted Drusch about being involved in a theft from a vehicle, which Drusch denied. Zilge got in his squad car, and Drusch called the officer a "smart (expletive deleted)," the report said. Drusch reported that Zilge pushed him against a vehicle and threw him to the ground. Two witnesses also said Zilge threw Drusch to the ground, according to a report. Zilge said he did not push Drusch and he wasn't trying to harm him, the report said. Drusch reported no injury. St. Paul Park Police Chief Michael Monahan upheld the misconduct allegations, and gave Zilge a written reprimand. He also extended Zilge's probation (he'd become a St. Paul Park police officer in August 2005, after working as a Newport police officer, with no record of complaints) and recommended additional use-of-force training.​

    Star Tribune: FBI reviewing case of St. Paul cop shown on video kicking suspect (Sept 5 2012)

    Zilge also was disciplined for pushing an 18-year-old man and throwing him to the ground while working as a St. Paul Park officer in 2006. St. Paul Park Police Chief Michael Monahan found Zilge, 31, culpable in that incident. The chief recommended that Zilge undergo additional training in constitutional law and in the use of force after he threatened to jail the man for calling him a "smart (expletive deleted)," according to city police records.

    "It seems very disappointing that he got the [St. Paul] job with that history, and here we are with the new job and he's got a repeat," said Jeffry Martin, NAACP president in St. Paul. "It doesn't help the situation." Zilge worked for St. Paul Park, a city of about 5,300 residents in south Washington County, from 2005 until he left to join the St. Paul police in 2008.
    Minnesota Public Radio: St. Paul officer placed on leave was suspended in 2010 for excessive force (Sept 5 2012)

    Zilge worked for the city of St. Paul Park's police department before taking a job with the St. Paul Police Department. In 2006, the St. Paul Park Police Department confirmed allegations of misconduct against Zilge for "use of force" without "criteria." According to the St. Paul Park Police Department's final report on the Feb. 14 2006 incident, Zilge admitted to a confrontation with a then 18-year-old man where he referred to him as a "marked man." Two witnesses told the police investigator that Zilge grabbed the man "by the jacket and turned and threw" him to the ground. Zilge told the investigator that he put his hands on the man's shoulders, but denied that he pushed him to the ground. No one was injured in the incident.

    ...

    Zilge started working for the St. Paul Police Department on March 17, 2008. Police records show Zilge received an "oral reprimand" from the St. Paul Police Department for "improper procedure" on Jan. 22, 2009.

    Gorans, the other officer on adminstrative leave following the Aug. 28 incident was previously "disciplined by Chief [Thomas] Smith for Excessive Force" on Sept. 26, 2010 and suspended for three days, according to police records.

    KARE 11: FBI reviewing arrest by St. Paul Police officer (Sept 6 2012)

    In 2006 when [Jesse] Zilge was an officer with St. Paul Park Police Department he threw a suspect to the ground, according to police records. "He like pie-faced him, grabbed him by the head and threw him to the ground," said Lisa Suchier ... Zilge was apparently questioning him about a stolen car.​

    Minnesota Public Radio: St. Paul officer on leave cost city $250,000 in previous case (Sept 7 2012)

    One of the St. Paul police officers [Matthew Gorans] placed on administrative leave after the violent arrest of a man last week was a participant in an earlier excessive force case that cost the city $250,000 ... According to St. Paul Police Department documents, Gorans had also been suspended for three days in May 2012 after an internal investigation found he used excessive force in an arrest on Sept. 26, 2010.

    In that incident, Gorans was one of the officers who pursued Anthony Clark near the Station 4 bar in St. Paul. Clark's fiance had been questioned by police in the bar. Clark said he offered to escort her outside, but was pushed by police. Feeling threatened, Clark said he hid in a nearby alley. After he revealed himself to police, Clark said he was struck in the back of the head five or more times when he was on the ground. Gorans told the internal affairs investigator he kneed or kicked Clark four or five times.

    Star Tribune: Police officer suspended earlier for kicking man (Sept 8 2012)

    Officer Matthew Gorans was ordered suspended for three days without pay after the St. Paul Police Department's internal affairs unit found that he used excessive force when he kicked and kneed a man several times in the head and neck area outside a bar in 2010, according to internal affairs police records made available Friday.

    ...

    According to internal affairs records, Zilge was orally reprimanded in 2009 for improper procedure after allowing a female passenger with a suspended driver's license to drive a vehicle after a traffic investigation revealed the driver of the vehicle did not have a valid license.

    Zilge also was disciplined for pushing an 18-year-old man and throwing him to the ground in 2006 while working as a St. Paul Park officer.
  13. M

    M Muckraker

    Star Tribune: Editorial: Police brutality in the age of YouTube (Sept 6 2012)

    St. Paul police Chief Thomas Smith put the officers on leave and asked his internal-affairs unit to investigate. Citizens can hope that the internal unit will do what's right, but there is understandable skepticism whenever police are asked to police themselves. Investigations such as this are more credible if civilian review is part of the process.

    The St. Paul case also demonstrates the importance of selecting officers with the right temperament for the job and training them well. After the 1991 Rodney King beating in California and the 2006 Derryl Jenkins assault in Minneapolis, officers ought to fully understand the damage done by brutality. They should be even more inclined to think twice now that dash cams are mounted on many squad cars -- and because almost everyone carries a smartphone.

    ...

    Over the years, St. Paul police chiefs and their staffs have worked diligently to build relationships with communities they serve. To maintain those gains, it is imperative that the kind of brutality seen in the Hightower case is never tolerated, and that the offending officers are appropriately disciplined.
  14. M

    M Muckraker

    Pioneer Press: Cop-kicking video: Arrested man get 45 days in earlier assault (Sept 14 2012)

    The man who was kicked by a St. Paul police officer in an incident recorded on a bystander's cellphone was sentenced Friday, Sept. 14, in an unrelated assault case. Eric Hightower, 30, of St. Paul was given 45 days in jail and placed on probation for five years. Ramsey County District Judge Salvador Rosas also ordered Hightower to pay restitution in an amount to be determined and abstain from drugs and alcohol. He gave Hightower credit for the 18 days he has served in jail. A separate charge of drug possession from a July 2011 incident was dismissed.

    Star Tribune: Man kicked by St. Paul police sentenced in unrelated assault (Sept 14 2012)

    The man shown in a YouTube video being kicked by a St. Paul police officer was ordered Friday to serve 45 days in the Ramsey County workhouse for an unrelated case. Eric R. Hightower, 32, of North St. Paul, was sentenced to one year and one day, which was stayed for five years, meaning he doesn't have to serve more than 45 days unless he violates probation. Hightower pleaded guilty in July to third-degree assault for a 2011 incident. According to court documents, he punched a man in the face several times, knocking out his two front teeth.
  15. M

    M Muckraker

    Pioneer Press: St. Paul: Officers shown in video return to work (Sept 17 2012)

    Two St. Paul police officers who had been on paid leave are back at work, but not on patrol, as an internal affairs investigation continues into an arrest captured on video that shows one officer kicking a man ... Effective Thursday, Sept. 13, Zilge was assigned to the police technology development unit and Gorans to the property room, police spokesman Howie Padilla said Monday. Both officers had been on patrol. They will be less likely to encounter the public in their new assignments.

    CBS Local Minnesota: St. Paul Cops In YouTube Arrest Video Return To Work; Not On Patrol (Sept 17 2012)

    Two St. Paul police officers who were involved in a controversial YouTube arrest video have returned to work, but have not been assigned to patrol, according to St. Paul Police ... According to St. Paul Police spokesman Howie Padilla, Officer Zilge was assigned to the Technology Development unit and Gorans assigned to the property room on Sept. 13.
  16. M

    M Muckraker

    Pioneer Press: St. Paul man kicked by police pleads not guilty to stalking, threats charges (Sept 21 2012)

    The St. Paul man who was kicked by a police officer as he lay on a sidewalk last month has pleaded not guilty to aggravated stalking, terroristic threats and criminal damage to property. Eric Hightower, 30, appeared in Ramsey County District Court on Friday, Sept. 21. Judge Salvador Rosas found that there was probable cause to continue the case for trial, and a not-guilty plea was entered on Hightower's behalf.

    Stillwater Gazette: Woodbury, St. Paul police incidents call training into question (Sept 21 2012)

    Action resulting in a questionable kicking of a suspect in St. Paul and the shooting of a hostage in Woodbury in two unrelated incidents have raised questions on when and what type of force police should use in threatening situations. Police officers must make split-second decisions when lives are in danger. Officers are trained to enforce the law while at the same time to protect people whose lives are in danger. The use of force depends on each situation and police officers will tell you that each situation is different. That use of force can range from giving a verbal command to shooting someone “to stop the threat.”

Share This Page

submit to reddit      Digg This          Delicious